Articles Written By: Lynn Louise Wonders

This author has written 56 articles

Lynn Louise Wonders, MA, LPC, RPT-S is an early childhood development and parenting expert. She offers private coaching and consultation for parents throughout the U.S. She is a well-known professional in the field of play therapy, providing training, supervision and mentoring to child therapists world-wide having practiced for more than 15 years in schools, child development centers and through her private practice.

Bond With Your Child Through Play!

Some of the world’s greatest philosophers, including Aristotle and Plato, have written about the reasons play is so important for social and emotional development. Highly revered play theorist, Dr. Garry Landreth, tells us that play helps us feel connected to one another; it stimulates creative thinking and exploration, while supporting a healthy, positive development of self. Stanley Greenspan, M.D., professor of pediatrics and parenting author, tells us that playing helps children develop the social skills necessary for getting along with…

27 Ways to Express Love to Your Little One

Young children need to feel connected, heard, seen and celebrated! Here are 27 ideas you can use to show your love for your little one, which are inspired by the 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman. Connect Through Loving Touch Cuddle whenever you can! Give him a piggy back or airplane ride on the floor or in a grassy yard. Give her a back rub. Snuggle up and read books together. Tussle his hair when you walk by. Rub lotion…

Going Back to School After Winter Break

The holiday season is marked by irregular schedules, family travel, out-of-town guests and a lot of sugar! Now, it's time to go back to preschool! This transition can be tough for young children and their parents. Here are a few tips you can observe to help your child get back in the groove. Back to bedtime: Start two or three nights before going back-to-school. Create a soothing bedtime ritual that contributes to winding down and easing into an earlier bedtime.…
Mother talking to her upset daughter

Five Ways to Help Your Child Handle Emotions

Research shows that children who have received emotion coaching from their parents are less likely to have behavioral disorders and they have higher academic achievement…

Helping Preschoolers with Major Life Change

Change is difficult for all of us. When major changes happen in a young child’s life – a house move, school change or parents’ divorce – it is important to consider the developmental state of your preschooler and be prepared to help her through the transition. Here are some tips: Prepare your preschooler but don’t over-explain! Provide your child just enough information to give him a heads-up that his life is about to change and create a time and place where…

The Power of Play: Enhancing Parent-Child Relationships

Early childhood development experts call the span between ages 2-5 “The Play Years” for a very good reason. Play is essential to a young child’s mental, emotional and social development. Playing helps children explore and develop their sense of who they are in the world. It can also be a wonderful agent for enriching the parent-child relationship. For parents, play-time is a chance to observe and notice what's foremost in their child's heart and mind. By allowing for some playful time…

Why It’s Better to Encourage Than Praise

Summer often gives us the opportunity to spend more time with our children. What a great time to practice new parenting skills! In my workshops…

The Foundation of Trust: Parenting Infants

Establishing a foundation of trust with your infant is key to helping your child feel secure. A solid foundation of trust and attachment affects how she will interact, communicate and form relationships with others throughout life. This process of bonding and establishing trust takes place within your interactions. The way you respond to your baby’s cries and other cues are what help your baby to feel understood and safe in the world. Your tone of voice, gestures, facial expressions and…

There’s a Reason for All Behavior: Why Young Children Do What They Do

Behaviors are simply means of communication. Young children have not yet developed the cognitive ability to identify and express verbally what it is they need and want. They have not yet mastered the ability to handle the emotional energy of frustration or fear. So, they act out. They may pout. They may scream. They may throw a toy across the room. While the actual behavior must be addressed, it is imperative that parents seek to understand the reason underlying the…
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